No one said being a student at university would be easy, but surely you shouldn’t be under this much stress? As your stress grows, your performance drops, and that’s no good if you want to graduate with top marks.

Take a look at the 9 ways you can reduce stress during your studies and you’ll feel better in no time.

STUDY LITTLE AND OFTEN SO THAT YOU DON’T FEEL DAUNTED

So often people fall into the trap of thinking that lectures and contact time is where the hard work is done. Whilst this is where you get exposed to new ideas, it’s your study time that really makes the difference.

Studying little and often is the best way to build on what you’ve heard in your lectures. Here’s how you can make it part of your daily routine with little or no effort:

Choose a space to study in that’s free from distractions
Put your phone away and turn on some music
Keep your study time to 2 hours or less at any given time to optimize your concentration

SKIM THE SYLLABUS ONE LECTURE AHEAD SO THAT YOU DON’T GET OVERWHELMED

There’s a lot to be said for knowing what’s coming next. When a lecturer unveils a brand new topic it’s so easy to become lost in the jargon. If you take a cursory look at the syllabus after each lecture, you’ll know what’s coming next.

Even if all you do is learn the jargon and terms that the next lecture focuses on, you’ll be a step ahead. Ideal if you want to be able to take on board as much as possible at the time.

USE REVISION WEEK FOR REVISING, NOT FOR CRAMMING!

By studying little and often throughout the semester you’ll be able to leave the revision to revision week. Your peers might be stressed out of their minds because they’re trying to cram. But you’ll be in a serene state of calmness as you refresh your memory of a few of the finer details.

PRACTICE MINDFULNESS EVEN WHEN YOU DON’T FEEL STRESSED

Mindfulness is anything that distracts you from feelings of stress and anxiety. It can be something as simple as naming the capital city of countries to break up a busy day. Or you could make half an hour to read before you go to bed.

Whatever it is, the most important thing is to make it a part of your daily routine. That way you can insulate yourself against the impact of stress by being proactive. That’ll be far more beneficial over the long term than reacting to stress once it has already begun.

EAT HEALTHY BALANCED MEALS, AND CERTAINLY 

Eat healthy balanced meals, and certainly, don’t skip breakfast
You are what you eat, which means if you eat poorly, you’ll perform poorly. There are all sorts of energy drinks and ‘brain foods’ on the market, but there’s no substitute for a healthy balanced diet. Here are a few examples that you could use:

Porridge with skimmed milk for breakfast
A light chicken salad with no dressing for lunch
Fresh fish and vegetables for dinner

You may not think it’s the most appetizing of menus, but it could make all the difference to how you perform.

SLEEP 8 HOURS A NIGHT AS OFTEN AS YOU CAN

If you want to perform at your best, then you need to put the all-nighters to bed — literally. You may be able to get away with it once in a while, but losing out on sleep massively impairs your cognitive abilities. In other words: the less sleep you get, the poorer your ability to learn will become.

Here are 3 ideas that will help you become strict with your sleep:
Plan your day around getting to sleep on time — don’t make it something you do when everything else is done
Follow a routine — do one thing at a time so you’re not rushing
Don’t use your phone as an alarm clock — you’ll just end up on social media

AVOID SOCIAL JET LAG BY NOT PARTYING TOO HARD ON THE WEEKENDS

We all need to blow off some steam from time to time, that’s only natural. It’s important to cut loose and enjoy yourself, but you should never do it at the expense of your studies.

Social jet lag is a real phenomenon, and it will hit you hard on a Monday morning. You’ll then spend the first half of the week trying to get your body back in synch. Before you know it you’ll be partying on the weekend and the whole cycle starts all over again.

By trying as best as you can to stick to the same sleeping pattern 7 days a week, you’ll be able to get the most out of your body. It may not sound like it will make all that much difference, but try it for 2 weeks and you’ll be amazed.

JOIN A SPORTS TEAM SO THAT WORKING OUT BECOMES PART OF YOUR ROUTINE

Regular exercise is a really important part of relaxing. It allows you to focus on learning something completely different, and it gives you a sense of achievement.

If you want to build some socializing into your training, then take up a team sport like football or rowing. That way you’ll have one activity that allows you to work up a sweat, and mix with people you wouldn’t otherwise meet. Ideal if you want to avoid the burnout that will come by doing nothing but studying night and day.

ALWAYS PLAN TO TAKE SUNDAYS OFF

The final thing to remember is that sometimes, less is more. It’s all very well committing to studying 10 hours a day, 7 days a week, but how does this impact your quality of life? Not only that, but when are you going to give your brain time to rest and relax?

By structuring your week so that Sunday is a free day, you’ll be able to get some rest-bite from the demands of full-time study. Every now and then you may have to work on an assignment or do a little extra revision. But provided you have the option to take it off more often than not, you’ll get the rest you need.

Daniela McVicker,

Author Bio – Daniela McVicker is an editor for TopWritersReview. She is also an experienced writer with a degree in social psychology from Durham University. Daniela is primarily focused on writing about self-improvement. She has authored a number of insightful and motivating articles like “Making The Right Choices Every Day” and “7 Steps to Open Yourself to New Opportunities & Possibilities”.

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